Historic Campana elm tree on UMaine campus gets cut down

Historic Campana elm tree on UMaine campus will get reduce down

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The 150-year-old tree was efficiently handled in opposition to dutch elm illness and impressed a campus pure heritage fund.

ORONO, Maine — For greater than 150 years, the Campana elm known as the College of Maine’s Orono campus dwelling, and the tree held an vital historic significance to the establishment. 

“This tree is totally a campus landmark,” UMaine President Joan Ferinni-Mundy stated. “I’ve been informed folks have been married underneath the tree. It’s a spot we actually have celebrated the pure panorama of this college by means of an unimaginable mixture of labor from our campus leaders and researchers.” 

Just lately, arborists decided the principle trunk of the Campana elm was virtually fully rotted, which created security considerations, in line with the college. Final week, the tree needed to be reduce down. 

This wasn’t UMaine’s final elm, however the Campana was the college’s most outstanding and oldest.

Within the Thirties, the lethal dutch elm illness was launched in Ohio and finally discovered its solution to Maine and the Campana elm. 

“Plant pathologist Richard Campana efficiently handled this tree in opposition to the illness with a fungicide that he and his shut colleagues developed,” UMaine professor Susan Brawley defined.

Within the Nineteen Seventies, Campana and his college students tried to avoid wasting the contaminated elms on campus. In 1977, an estimated 60% of them had been contaminated with Dutch elm illness, however Campana’s workforce was capable of hold a few of them alive with chemical injections, together with the Campana elm later named after him, in line with UMaine. 

To make sure the tree lives on, cuttings from it have been collected to hold on its legacy. 

“It was crucial for us to make an try and propagate the tree figuring out we had been going to lose it,” UMaine’s superintendent of horticultural services, Brad Libby, informed NEWS CENTER Maine. 

The Campana elm additionally impressed the creation of the Campus Pure Heritage Endowment Fund. It helps the beautification of the UMaine campus and teaching programs. 

“I hope being reminded of this elm and all the bizarre great thing about the College of Maine campus in comparison with many universities will assist to encourage folks to show their disappointment into some contributions to this endowment fund so we are able to construct it and actually take good care of this campus for an extended, very long time to come back,” Brawley stated.

To donate to the Campus Pure Heritage Endowment Fund, go surfing or contact the College of Maine Basis at umainefoundation@maine.edu.

Extra NEWS CENTER Maine Tales

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries

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