Revealed on Wednesday, June 29, 2022

A MAJOR plan that guides the administration of Leicester’s ‘city forest’ has been formally reviewed to replicate the progress that’s been made throughout 2021/22.

The town council’s tree technique was printed in November 2018, setting out the council’s dedication to sustaining and replenishing its tree inventory and enhancing the standard of the bushes in its care.

It additionally reaffirmed the council’s coverage of planting multiple tree to interchange any tree that’s misplaced – and recognised the necessary function that bushes play in decreasing air air pollution, supporting wildlife and mitigating the influence of floods.

Now, the council’s bushes & woodlands crew have revisited the five-year plan to assessment the progress that’s been made up to now 12 months.

The assessment report – introduced to the Neighbourhood Providers Scrutiny Fee – notes that town council planted 19 new bushes for each tree misplaced in 2021/22, and planted a complete of 11,753 bushes in Leicester in 2021/22, with most of them (10,396) planted in schemes supported by the Forestry Fee, Earthwatch or Trees for Cities.

These embrace round 4,200 bushes at metropolis faculties, 3,400 small bushes in Appleton Park, 905 bushes in Monks Relaxation Gardens – and 80 massive bushes, 60 fruit bushes and 1,875 small bushes in Western Park.

As well as, round 750 small bushes got out to the general public to mark the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee, whereas a trio of bushes – chosen for his or her purple, white and blue foliage – have been planted in Abbey Park as a part of The Queen’s Inexperienced Cover challenge.

In the identical interval, 607 bushes – largely in poor situation – have been felled, together with 60 diseased bushes in Western Park, which have been eliminated to restrict the unfold of a lethal pathogen referred to as phytophthora.

All by-product waste from tree works was recycled and repurposed as biofuel, woodchip or logs.

An motion plan for managing the influence of a second lethal pathogen – ash dieback – can be printed throughout 2022/23. The illness – first recognised within the UK in 2012 – is having a devastating impact on ash bushes throughout Europe and is now well-established in Leicester. It’s estimated that ash dieback will end result within the lack of round 15,000 ash bushes from town council’s tree inventory over the subsequent 10 years.

Deputy metropolis mayor for the surroundings Cllr Adam Clarke mentioned: “This formal assessment offers us a possibility to look again on what we’ve achieved and renew our dedication to rising the variety of bushes within the metropolis council’s possession, whereas making certain that the standard of our tree inventory continues to be improved.

“Trees are massively worthwhile to our metropolis, bringing environmental and ecological advantages and vastly enhancing the look of our streets, parks and open areas – whereas supporting our well-being.

“However there are challenges for our bushes and woodlands crew, as lethal pathogens resembling phytophthora and ash dieback have an effect on the bushes within the metropolis, and tree species which are extra immune to illness have to be planted of their place.

“Our tree technique will proceed to information the administration of town’s bushes and woodlands by these difficult occasions – and assist be sure that town’s city forest is maintained and expanded for future generations to take pleasure in.”

Leicester Metropolis Council manages a tree inventory of 168,000 particular person bushes and 111 hectares of woodland.

This consists of bushes in parks and open areas, on freeway verges, on housing estates, throughout the grounds of faculties, and round group services.

Tree cover covers round 16% of town.

 

 

 

Image caption: A blue-leafed eucalyptus tree is planted in Abbey Park as a part of the Queen’s Inexperienced Cover challenge.

 

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